Teaching

University of Leeds is the only university to offer a course at the undergraduate level dedicated exclusively to studying the topic of the Responsibility to Protect. ‘The Responsibility to Protect and to Prosecute’ is a third level undergraduate module offered in the School of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at the University of Leeds.

Undergraduate level Module: The Responsibility to Protect and to Prosecute (PIED 3502)

Professors: Dr Adrian Gallagher and Dr Cristina Stefan 

Objectives: This module aims to provide students with an advanced knowledge of the contemporary debates that surround the Responsibility to Protect. In so doing, it will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the issues that surround prevention and prosecution through a focus on case studies, the emergence of the R2P as a norm, and the International Criminal Court. The outcome of which is that students will be able to critically analyse some of the most important developments in contemporary international affairs.

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate appropriate cognitive, communicative, and transferable skills including an ability to evaluate advanced concepts, to employ primary and secondary sources, to present reasoned and effective arguments in written and oral form, to pursue independent learning and to show critical judgement
  • Understand key concepts such as legitimacy, international law, sovereignty, and humanitarian intervention.
  • Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast different case studies of mass atrocity crimes
  • Critically analyse the political nature of international legal developments through an analysis of the International Criminal Court.

A Masters level module dedicated exclusively to the topic of the Responsibility to Protect will be offered in the School of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at the University of Leeds in the next academic year (2017-2018). Graduate students will have access to this module.

Graduate level Module: The Responsibility to Protect

Professor: Dr Cristina Stefan 

Objectives: This module explores in depth the contemporary debates related to the ‘Responsibility to Protect’ (R2P) doctrine of protection, which is one of the most important developments in world politics in the last decades. The module provides students with an in-depth understanding of the key legal, political, ethical issues surrounding R2P. It starts with the context within which the idea of R2P took shape, and addresses the existing bodies of theory concerned with the nature of protection and the foundations of the political and international order, including theoretical debates and controversies that are relevant to R2P and international protection in mass atrocity situations. The students will explore, in detail, the strength and legitimacy of the R2P norm, its relationship with international law, and several cross-cutting themes, such as linkages between R2P and conflict prevention, ‘Responsibility while Protecting’, and specific case studies to which R2P applies.  The main outcome relates to students achieving an advanced understanding of debates about the implications, policies and challenges related to implementing ‘The Responsibility to Protect’ in contemporary international affairs.

 Through this module, students will be able to:

  • Acquire a masterly awareness of key academic debates on international protection in cases of mass atrocity, and on The Responsibility to Protect;
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply theoretical concepts on R2P to the analysis of contemporary cases of mass atrocities, and develop an ability to compare and contrast different case studies of mass atrocity crimes;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of some of the key policy debates within international and regional organisations (the UN, EU, AU) relevant to the implementation of the R2P and its political nature;
  • Thoroughly understand the distinct elements of the Three Pillars of the R2P, and how they relate to key concepts such as sovereignty, legitimacy, the use of force, and international law;
  • Develop appropriate communicative, research, and transferable skills including an ability to evaluate advanced concepts, to present reasoned and effective arguments in written and oral form, to show critical judgement, and to pursue independent learning.

 

Last updated March 10th 2017