Past Events

ECR2P Film Series: Shake Hands with the Devil 

Introduced by: Dr Cristina G. Stefan

When: Tuesday 16 October, 2018. 5:15-7:30

Where: Parkinson Room B.09

About the ECR2P Film Series: 
Every fortnight (on Tuesdays from 5:15 to 7:30pm), a fictional film or documentary related to human protection will be shown. It will be introduced by a POLIS staff member who will also facilitate a post-screening discussion.
Screenings are free and open to all University of Leeds students and staff.

Note: Due to the nature of the topics discussed, you may find some parts of the movies upsetting

 

ECR2P Film Series: The Peacekeepers

Introduced by: Blake Lawrinson

When: Tuesday 30 October, 2018. 5:15-7:30

Where: Parkinson Room B.09

About the ECR2P Film Series: 
Every fortnight (on Tuesdays from 5:15 to 7:30pm), a fictional film or documentary related to human protection will be shown. It will be introduced by a POLIS staff member who will also facilitate a post-screening discussion.
Screenings are free and open to all University of Leeds students and staff.

Note: Due to the nature of the topics discussed, you may find some parts of the movies upsetting

 

ECR2P 2018 Annual Lecture: Professor Jennifer Welsh, Former UN Assistant Secretary-General and Special Adviser on the R2P

Monday 22nd October 2018, 17:15-19:00

Location: Conference Auditorium 2 (GM.01) this room is wheelchair accessible – see here for details and directions
Registration: The event is free, but registration is essential. Please register here
Please note that photos will be taken at this public event.

 

Conference of the BISA Intervention & R2P Working Group
‘Alternatives to military intervention under R2P’
Fri 21 September 2018, 09:00 – 18:30
Venue: Charles Thackrah Building, 1.01-1.04

This year the general theme will be ‘alternatives to military intervention under R2P’. The choice of topic is because much of the R2P literature to date has focused on the military (and often contentious) aspects of R2P. At this event, we will have papers that will explore the case for non-military ways of addressing mass atrocities, under the second and third pillars of R2P. This will include both the ‘reactive’ measures of R2P, as well as some of the ‘preventive’ ones, specifically those concerned with ‘direct’ or ‘imminent’ prevention. There is potential to create a special issue as an output from the workshop.
The keynote speaker for this event will be Joanne Neenan, who works with the FCO and the LSE (speaking in a personal capacity). Joanne is an international lawyer and a diplomat who works on Women, Peace and Security, and formerly worked with the UK Mission to the United Nations.

We are also holding a roundtable on James Pattison’s new book The Alternatives to War, which will include presentations from Cristina Stefan, Stephen McLoughlin, and Chris Finlay.

The conference programme for the day is available here

We will also have some general sessions, for those members who are working on other topics related to intervention and R2P.
Topics include:
• UN sanctions
• Peace vs justice
• The UN’s relationship with the International Criminal Court
• Regional organisations and R2P
• UN Security Council practices in responding to mass atrocity crimes
• Legitimacy and the implementation of R2P
• Unarmed civilian peacekeeping
• Any other topics connected to R2P and intervention
Attendance and participation is not limited to members of BISA or the working group. Please register here
Lunch and tea/coffee will be provided on the day.
The winners of the annual book and ECR article awards will also be announced.

University of Queensland Symposium
The Future of Norm Studies Research
Friday July 20th 2018. 

One of ECR2P’s key research themes is “R2P and Norm Theory” which involves our researchers engaging with Norm Studies which has grown to be a significant strand of International Relations theory over the last two decades. To develop this, Dr. Gallagher has organised a one day workshop ‘The Future of Norm Studies Research’ to be held at the University of Queensland on July 20th 2018. To do this, he is working with Antje Wiener (Hamburg), Sarah Percy (University of Queensland) and Phil Orchard (University of Wollongong). The workshop is co-funded by the University of Queensland, the University of Leeds, and the Asia-Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect. This follows on from Dr. Gallagher’s ISA Catalyst workshop ‘Tacking Stock of the Past to Shape the Future of Norm Studies’. Held in Baltimore, February 2017. For all enquires email a.gallagher@leeds.ac.uk

The ‘Responsibility to Protect’: Interdisciplinary perspectives and future directions for research
Date & Time: Wednesday 6 June 2018, 2pm – 4pm

Venue: Seminar room 14.33, Social Sciences Building, University of Leeds

The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) agreement was unanimously endorsed by United Nations member states in 2005 as a commitment to protect people from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity. The principle commits states not only to the protection of their own populations – something already deeply embedded in international human rights law – but also to the populations of other states, most importantly through international assistance or action when states are manifestly failing to provide protection. However, the operationalization of R2P has been deeply controversial. This seminar will explore cutting-edge perspectives on R2P from different disciplinary perspectives, based upon the final doctoral research results of three PhD students who are White Rose DTC network award holders, supervised by cross-institutional teams in Leeds, Sheffield and York. The event will also feature researchers attached to the European Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, based at the University of Leeds, who will consider future directions for R2P research.

The main presentations will be:
• Chloë Gilgan, Centre for Applied Human Rights, Research Centre for the Social Sciences, University of York: ‘The UK’s commitment to the Responsibility to Protect norm and its resettlement policies on Syrian refugees fleeing mass atrocities’.
• Samuel Jarvis, Department of Politics, University of Sheffield: ‘The Responsibility to Protect and the Limits to Moral Progress: Assessing ‘Common Humanity’ as a Driver of State Behaviour’.
• Daniel Wand, School of Politics and International studies, University of Leeds: ‘The International Criminal Court and the BRICS States: Solidarist Progress and Pluralist Limits in a Changing International Society’.

Abstracts

The UK’s commitment to the Responsibility to Protect norm and its resettlement policies on Syrian refugees fleeing mass atrocities – Chloë Gilgan
This presentation considers how powerful liberal states that support R2P, like the UK, are using the resettlement of refugees to partly fulfil their responsibility to protect Syrians from mass atrocities. While academics and R2P advocates presume a link between R2P and resettlement, the research revealed three important outcomes. First, the notion that resettlement is automatically linked to R2P presents unavoidable conceptual gaps that have not been addressed in the literature. Second, regardless of the aspirational R2P arguments for providing resettlement as R2P protection, liberal humanitarian states like the UK have not made the link on a practical level. As a permanent member of the UN Security Council and a member of the International Syria Support Group, the UK is a key player in the international effort to address the Syrian crisis. The research disaggregated the UK’s discursive and practical understanding of what it means to discharge its responsibility to protect Syrians from mass atrocities in the context of resettlement across some of the relevant agencies that comprise the UK government. The findings stem from the interpretative analysis of two primary sources: Official documents and interviews from parliament, the FCO, the Home Office and DFID. The research revealed that misconceptions around R2P, especially its conflation with military intervention, have not only prevented consensus on the UN Security Council but have resulted in the UK’s failure to link R2P to existing national responses that would fit within R2P’s remit of using ‘diplomatic, humanitarian and other peaceful means’ to help protect Syrians from mass atrocities. This is due to the relevant agencies in the UK possessing different understandings of what constitutes R2P implementation. Thus, the research is highly relevant for evaluating the normative force of R2P when a state’s usual or preferred responses are impossible, and the crisis persists. Finally, the third outcome of the research revealed that civil society does not use R2P as leverage when advocating to states for increased resettlement for several reasons that will also influence R2P’s norm status.

‘The Responsibility to Protect and the Limits to Moral Progress: Assessing ‘Common Humanity’ as a Driver of State Behaviour’ – Samuel Jarvis
The philosophical and moral foundations of humanity’s relationship to the Responsibility to Protect have for a long time remained a largely overlooked element of the R2P literature. Whilst more recent scholarship has attempted to close this theoretical gap, it has most often focused on humanity as a moral benchmark in which to measure the current progress of the R2P against. However, what still remains highly contested is the extent to which humanity can in fact provide the significant normative weight and metaphysical heavy lifting for such moral arguments. In response to this lacuna, the thesis focuses on two central questions. Firstly, does the concept of humanity provide a sufficient justification for why states should have a moral responsibility to protect those threatened by mass atrocity crimes? Secondly, to what extent can humanity function as a motivational force able to mobilise states in support of the R2P principle? In addressing these two questions, the thesis provides a more comprehensive understanding of humanity through locating its significant dual function, thus reinforcing the critical role humanity plays in underpinning the moral foundations of the central R2P crimes, as well as challenging the extent to which humanity can also motivate states to act on its behalf. In this sense, the concept of humanity can be best understood as a motivational factor that diminishes in influence as the R2P principle is diffused into action. The thesis therefore provides the foundations for a more intuitive understanding of the complex motivational factors involved in generating collective responses to the threat of mass atrocity crimes. In doing so, it is argued that the ability to fundamentally address the current R2P implementation gap will require an approach that is more reflective of the way humanity interacts with competing moral, legal and political pressures at the global level.

Solidarist Progress and Pluralist Limits in a Changing International Society – Daniel Wand
This research project examines the relationship between the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the BRICS States using an English School approach. The purpose of the project is twofold. First, it provides an original, comprehensive understanding of the views of the BRICS on the nature and operation of the world’s first permanent international criminal court, and how their interactions with it have affected the institution. Second, the project addresses the broader issue of the sustainability of liberal international society in the context of the progressive decline of the West and the rise of emerging powers, and using the ICC/BRICS data it advances an original understanding of how rising powers view global governance.
It was found, quite surprisingly, that the BRICS are generally supportive of the ICC and its work, which is consistent with their longstanding support for international criminal justice, but only to the extent that the Court does not seriously challenge the fundamental primary institutions of international society (i.e. sovereignty, diplomacy, multilateralism) or prevent pragmatic, state-based responses to transitional justice where they are most appropriate. It is thus established that the BRICS states support and have advanced cosmopolitan progress in the form of international criminal justice in international society but have pushed back against it where they have been required to defend a pluralist approach to global governance. It therefore be surmised that the issue for the BRICS is not cosmopolitan moral progress but how it is implemented. We are therefore unlikely to see any revolutionary change in international society but, if the balance of power continues to shift, the progression towards a world society understanding of global political order is likely to be halted and reversed in favour of a more pluralist conception.

The Question of Genocide Determination and the Response of the International Judicial System
Tuesday 20 March 2018, 12:00 – 2.00 PM
Committee Rm G House of Lords, UK Parliament
Confirmed speakers include: ECR2P Research Director, Dr Adrian Gallagher and the GCR2P’s, Dr Simon Adams among other experts.

Speakers will consider Lord (David) Alton’s Genocide Determination Bill, a private members’ bill, with the aim to ‘provide for the High Court of England and Wales to make a preliminary finding on cases of alleged genocide; and for the subsequent referral of such findings to the International Criminal Court or a special tribunal’. A comparable Bill has been introduced in the Commons by Fiona Bruce MP.
Speakers will explore the question of genocide determination and HMG’s argument that it is for the ‘international judicial system’ to determine genocide. The event is hosted by Lord Alton of Liverpool and Fiona Bruce MP, Member of Parliament for Congleton, and co-sponsored by the APPG on the Prevention of Genocide & Crimes Against Humanity.

European Centre for the Responsibility to Protect Research Seminar Series

The ECR2P’s new seminar series provides R2P researchers with the opportunity to present and receive feedback on their research from fellow R2P researchers. The seminars will take place on Mondays 3:30-4:30.

Monday 5 Feb. Board Room. Level 13 Social Sciences Building.
Chiara de Franco, ‘The practices of protection: understanding how the EU ‘does’ protection of civilians’

Monday 19 Feb. Board Room. Level 13 Social Sciences Building.
Adrian Gallagher (w/Docherty), “Investigating the role of expectations in norm dynamics: Divergent expectations over the 2011 military intervention in Libya”

Monday 19 March. (Location tbc).
Blagovesta (w/Alex Bellamy), “R2P and the Emergence of Responsibilities across Borders”.

Monday 16 April. Board Room. Level 13 Social Sciences Building.
Georgiana Epure, “The Responsibility to Prosecute: History and Politics”

Monday 21st May. Board Room. Level 13 Social Sciences Building
Jason Ralph and Sam Jervis: “The role and responsibility of the UK as a permanent member of the Security Council after the decision to leave the European Union”

Protecting Human Rights in a Changing and Insecure World

Monday 15th January 2018, 10am-4pm

Supported by the BISA Postgraduate Network

Conference Outline

This one-day conference, to be held at the University of Leeds on 15th January 2018, seeks to reflect on the challenges associated with protecting human rights in a changing and insecure international society. More specifically, the conference aims to interrogate and shed some light on the following issues:

  • The extent to which ‘backlash’ against the protection of human rights is occurring;
  • The ways in which it is occurring;
  • The reasons and influences behind this development;
  • The consequences for the protection of human rights including the operation of international institutions and regimes; and
  • What can be done to protect and enforce human rights in this environment?

The purpose of this conference is to bring together academic researchers, particularly those undertaking a doctorate or in the early stages of their research careers, with those involved in policy or the practice of human rights protection broadly conceived. The aim is to examine the current challenges to human rights protection and to identify solutions from academic, policy and practice perspectives.

The conference will provide an opportunity for doctoral students and early career researchers to engage with each another and share their work, as well as with those working in policy and practice.  One of the goals of the conference is to support interdisciplinary approaches and collaboration, so preference will be given to those taking an interdisciplinary approach to their work and to those focusing on under-researched topics and issues.

Location: SR 1.05, Charles Thackrah Building – this room is wheelchair accessible – see here for details and directions

If you would like to attend the conference but do not wish to present your research, please indicate your desire to attend to Daniel Wand ptdjhw@leeds.ac.uk

International Conference on The Responsibility to Protect, Peace & Security

Tuesday 12th December 2017, 09:00 – Wednesday, 13th December 2017, 17:30. 

This two-day international conference brought together women with expertise as senior academics, researchers, diplomats, active civil society representatives, and senior policy-makers, working in fields related to the Responsibility to Protect, Peace and Security. The conference also provided a platform for experts to discuss their research and work, and relates to the British-Academy-funded establishment of The Women Network on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), Peace and Security: Research and Impact. The event is organised by Dr Cristina Stefan, Co-Director of the European Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, based at the University of Leeds, and recipient of the British Academy Rising Star Engagement Award, from the British Academy, for 2017-2018, which funds this event.

The topics covered include:
• The Global State of R2P, Peace and Security Research, from the Perspectives of Women Academics and Practitioners
• Researching Women, Peace and Security
• Assessing the Importance of an Atrocity Prevention Focus
• Regional Contexts of Violence and Protection, including perspectives regarding Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America
• Assessing Protection Responsibilities in the European context
• International Law, Human Rights, and the United Nations
• Insights on Bridging the Gaps: From Academics to Policy-Makers, from Research to Impact

ECR2P 2017 Annual Lecture: Dr Ivan Šimonović, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Special Adviser on the R2P

Thursday 30th November 2017, 17:00-19:00

 

 

 

 

Location: Conference Auditorium 2 (GM.01) this room is wheelchair accessible – see here for details and directions

Registration: The event is free, but registration is essential. Please register here

Please note that recordings and photos will be taken at this public event.

Mass Atrocity Prevention in Practice Roundtable: Gender-Based Mass Atrocity Prevention

Monday 27 November, 2017 at 14:00-17:00

 

 

 

 

Until recently the human rights of women, have been marginalised from the mainstream human rights discourse. This is largely because women have been excluded from both the substance and the process of international human rights law. Issues concerning their rights were mainly considered to belong to the private sphere and their violation was often defended in the name of culture. The Report of UN Secretary General on R2P in 2013 notes that “gender discrimination and inequality increase the underlying risks associated with sexual and gender-based violence” and highlighted the nexus between gender and mass atrocity crimes. The UN Framework of Analysis for the Prevention of Atrocity Crimes stresses the need to dedicate specific attention to ‘acts of violence against women and children, or creation of conditions that facilitate acts of sexual violence against those groups’ and integrates gender in the early warning analysis of situations at risk. The UN Resolution 2171/2014 acknowledges that gender-based violence can be ‘an early indication of a descent into conflict or escalation of conflict’.

In the light of the increasing acknowledgement of gender-based violence as an especially prevalent feature of mass atrocity crimes, and the ongoing sexual violence in several countries including Syria, it is imperative to highlight the specific legal, political, and practical challenges posed by ’rape as a weapon of war.’ By combining practitioner and scholarly perspectives, feasible prevention options need to be discussed. The event is organised by the Budapest Centre in cooperation with its partners within The European Centre for the Responsibility to Protect (ECR2P) and the Károli Gáspár University of the Reformed Church in Hungary.

Location: Károli Gaspard University of the Reformed Church in Budapest, Hungary, Ráday u. 28. The event is public but registration is required. Please register here

ECR2P Film Series: Year Zero: The Silent Death of Cambodia

Introduced by: Dr Adrian Gallagher

When: Tuesday 14 November 2017, 5-7:30pm

Where: Chemistry LT D, University of Leeds (Wheelchair accessible)

About the ECR2P Film Series: 
Every fortnight (on Tuesdays from 5 to 7:30pm), a fictional film or documentary related to human protection will be shown. It will be introduced by a POLIS staff member who will also facilitate a post-screening discussion.
Screenings are free and open to all University of Leeds students and staff.

ECR2P Film Series: Paragraph 175

Introduced by: Dr Kaisa Hinkkainen

When: Tuesday 31 October 2017, 5-7:30pm

Where: Chemistry LT D, University of Leeds (Wheelchair accessible)

About the ECR2P Film Series: 
Every fortnight (on Tuesdays from 5 to 7:30pm), a fictional film or documentary related to human protection will be shown. It will be introduced by a POLIS staff member who will also facilitate a post-screening discussion.
Screenings are free and open to all University of Leeds students and staff

ECR2P Film Series: The Act of Killing

Introduced by: Dr Adam Tyson

When: Tuesday 17 October 2017, 5-7:30pm

Where: Chemistry LT D, University of Leeds (Wheelchair accessible)

About the ECR2P Film Series: 
Every fortnight (on Tuesdays from 5 to 7:30pm), a fictional film or documentary related to human protection will be shown. It will be introduced by a POLIS staff member who will also facilitate a post-screening discussion.
Screenings are free and open to all University of Leeds students and staff.

ECR2P Film Series: When Good Men Do Nothing

Introduced by: Professor Jason Ralph

When: Tuesday 03 October 2017, 5-7:30pm

Where: Chemistry LT D, University of Leeds (Wheelchair accessible)

About the ECR2P Film Series: 
Every fortnight (on Tuesdays from 5 to 7:30pm), a fictional film or documentary related to human protection will be shown. It will be introduced by a POLIS staff member who will also facilitate a post-screening discussion.
Screenings are free and open to all University of Leeds students and staff.

V4 Report Launch & Discussion Capabilities of the Visegrad Group in Preventing Extremism

Friday 23 June 2017 at 9.30


The V4 Task Force on Mass Atrocities Prevention is an initiative of the Budapest Centre for Mass Atrocities Prevention, in collaboration with the Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade (Hungary), NOHA – University of Warsaw (Poland), the Slovak Foreign Policy Association (Slovakia), expert from the Czech Republic, and supported by the International Visegrad Fund. This is the final event of the V4 Task Force Initiative to map the capabilities of the Visegrad group in preventing extremism.

The 10-month Initiative was announced last September 2016 and followed the successful experience
obtained by the Budapest Centre during the activities of the 2013 EU Task Force on Mass Atrocities
Prevention and the 2016 African Task Force on Mass Atrocities Prevention. The event organized by the BCMAP in cooperation with the Institute of Foreign Affairs and Trade will provide the opportunity for participants to learn the outcomes of the Task Force’s activities and discuss the recommendations of the Task Force for the follow up of the Initiative.

Location: Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade, 13-15. Bérc utca, Budapest 1016. The event is public but registration is required. Please register here

Book Launch & Roundtable Discussion: Protecting Human Rights in the 21st Century

Thursday May 4th 2017, 16:00-18:00

 

Location: University of Leeds, Michael Sadler Building, SR (LG.15) – this room is wheelchair accessible – see here for details and directions

A Conversation on the role of International Criminal and Humanitarian Law in today’s world with ICC Judge Howard Morrison

Tuesday 21 March, 16:30-18:00

Location: University of Leeds, Michael Sadler Building, SR (LG.19) – this room is wheelchair accessible – see here for details and directions

 

The Cost of Doing Nothing

Thursday 16th March 2017, 16:00-17:30

 

Location: University of LeedsChemistry Building Lecture Theatre D. (G.35) – this room is wheelchair accessible – see here for details and directions

Before her tragic death, Jo Cox MP was working on a report “The Cost of Doing Nothing” in which she warns against the “rise of ‘unthinking pacifism’” and “anti-interventionism” .

Join the R2P Student Coalition as Dr. Adrian Gallagher presents on “The Cost of Doing Nothing” report followed by a Q&A.


ECR2P@Leeds POLIS Launch: Guest Lecture by Professor Alex Bellamy “Implementing R2P: Progress, Challenges and the Next 10 Years”

Thursday December 8th 2016

Photo courtesy of Dr Jess Gifkins.

When it comes to R2P, most of the normative struggle is now behind us while most of the operational challenges are still before us. Recognizing that a gap has emerged between the world’s normative commitment to R2P and its ability to make this principle a living reality, this talk called for a more comprehensive approach to the practice of R2P. This must include the full range of actors that play a role in inhibiting atrocity crimes and protecting vulnerable populations, including the new European Centre for R2P at the University of Leeds.

Professor Bellamy’s talk combined analysis of the normative effort to win support for the R2P principle with an examination of international responses to major crises since 2009, such as those in the Middle East (Libya, Syria, Yemen) and sub-Saharan Africa (DRC, South Sudan, Mali, CAR), as well as some critical cases before that time (notably Kenya and Sri Lanka). It suggested that whilst tangible progress has been made, significant challenges remain ahead that will require a redoubling of effort.

Listen to the lecture here, or download the recording (MP3, 23MB)


Putting the Responsibility to Protect at the Centre of Europe

Thursday 13th and Friday 14th October, 2016

This conference addressed the state of R2P at the global level and reflected on European perspectives.

Topics covered included ethics, gender, humanity, refugees and international law.

The Conference was held in University House on Thursday 13th and Friday 14th October, 2016.

Details of the conference programme, speakers, organisers as well as audio and video recordings of the presentations can currently be accessed on the conference website here.